Ian O'Byrne

Ian O'Byrne

Dr. W. Ian O’Byrne (@wiobyrne) is an associate professor of literacy education at the College of Charleston in South Carolina. His research focuses on the dispositions and literacy practices of individuals as they read, write, and communicate in online and/or hybrid spaces. His work can be found on his website (https://wiobyrne.com/) or in his weekly newsletter (https://digitallyliterate.net/).

Participate in the Friendly Review Mentor Call

Literacy Research: Theory, Method, and Practice, Vol. 72 Friendly Review Mentor Call   Scholars who present their work at the 2022 Conference, plan to submit their research to LR:TMP Volume 72, and have never before published in LR:TMP are invited to participate in the second year of the Friendly Review process. We are seeking mentors to support these authors.   What Is It A Friendly Review is a less formal and unofficial review by a volunteer scholar who is committed to mentoring others. The goal is to help authors move closer to a publishable paper with feedback from a trusted friendly reviewer. With this initiative, the LR:TMP editors hope to encourage and support new authors in LR:TMP, thus widening the LR:TMP tent to include even more of LRA’s diverse array of members, theoretical orientations, and methodologies.   When It Happens October 28, 2022: Application to serve as a Friendly Review Mentor due.   November 14, 2022: Learn who your friendly review author will be this week.   November 30 – December 3: Manuscripts due to friendly reviewers. Authors present papers at the 72st Annual LRA Conference (required). Meet with your author(s) in person at LRA or virtually to discuss one or two areas for which they would like your feedback.   January 13, 2023: Unofficial friendly review mentor feedback due to authors by this date, or by a mutually agreed upon date.   February 10, 2023: Submissions due to ScholarOne for official review.   How It Works LR:TMP Editors will connect authors with their mentors via email. The friendly review mentor will make arrangements to meet their author(s) virtually or in person during the conference. During this meeting, the author(s) will give the paper to the mentor and suggest one or two areas for which they wish to receive feedback. They will also agree upon a future date (before Jan. 13, 2023) to debrief after that mentor has had time to read the paper. The friendly review mentor will read the paper in preparation for the post-review meeting. The friendly review mentor will give constructive feedback on the agreed-upon focus areas with the intention of moving the paper closer to publication. Author(s) will submit their papers to ScholarOne by February 10, 2023 for an official double-masked peer review.   Please note: The Friendly Review and official Peer Review are completely separate processes.   If you would like to participate in the Friendly Review as a mentor, please fill out the Friendly Review Mentor Application at this link. Questions? Contact Taylor Rose, Lead Editorial Assistant at lrtmp@ua.edu.

Participate in the Friendly Review Author Call

Literacy Research: Theory, Method, and Practice, Vol. 72 Friendly Review Author Call Scholars who present their work at the 2022 Conference, plan to submit their research to LR:TMP Volume 72, and have never before published in LR:TMP are invited to participate in the third year of the Friendly Review process.   What Is It A Friendly Review is a less formal and unofficial review by a volunteer scholar who is committed to mentoring others. The goal is to help authors move closer to a publishable paper with feedback from a trusted friendly reviewer. With this initiative, the LR:TMP editors hope to encourage and support new submitters to LR:TMP, thus widening the LR:TMP tent to include even more of LRA’s diverse array of members, theoretical orientations, and methodologies.   When It Happens October 28, 2022: Application for Friendly Review due.   November 14, 2022: Learn who your friendly reviewer will be this week.   November 30 – December 3: Manuscripts due to friendly reviewers. Authors present papers at the 72st Annual LRA Conference (required). Meet with your author(s) in person at LRA or virtually to discuss the one or two areas for which they would like your feedback.   January 13, 2023: Unofficial friendly review mentor feedback due to authors by this date, or by a mutually agreed upon date.   February 10, 2023: Submissions due to ScholarOne for official review.   How It Works LR:TMP Editors will connect authors with their mentors via email. The friendly review mentor will make arrangements to meet their author(s) virtually or in person during the conference. During this meeting, the author(s) will give the paper to the mentor and suggest one or two areas for which they wish to receive feedback. They will also agree upon a future date (before Jan. 13, 2023) to debrief after that mentor has had time to read the paper. The friendly review mentor will read the paper in preparation for the post-review meeting. The friendly review mentor will give constructive feedback on the agreed-upon focus areas with the intention of moving the paper closer to publication. Author(s) will submit their revised papers to ScholarOne by February 10, 2023 for an official double-masked peer review.   Please note: The Friendly Review and Official Review are completely separate processes.   If you would like to participate in the Friendly Review as an author, please fill out the Friendly Review Author Application at this link.   Questions? Contact Taylor Rose, Lead Editorial Assistant at lrtmp@ua.edu.

LRA 2022 Student Outstanding Research Award

Are you a student already looking forward to this year’s LRA Conference? Have you conceptualized a promising paper based on your research? Would you like the opportunity to have your paper published in Literacy Research: Theory, Methods and Practice?   If so, please consider applying for the LRA 2022 Student Outstanding Research Award.   The Student Outstanding Research Award annually honors a student member of LRA in recognition of an outstanding research paper presented at the Annual Conference.   Requirements include the following: The author must hold student status. Research must be conducted by the student. Paper must be written solely by the student or co-authored with students. Paper cannot be co-authored or co-presented with a faculty member. Paper must have been accepted for presentation at the 2022 Conference. Papers representing various forms and genres of research (including conceptual papers) are welcome.   To be considered, submit your application to Jud Laughter at jud.laughter@utk.edu with “LRA 2022 SORA Application” in the subject by 1 September 2022.   For more information, visit https://literacyresearchassociation.org/student-outstanding- research-award/

Submit Nominations for the 2022 J. Michael Parker Award

If you are a doctoral student or early-career, untenured faculty submitting a proposal on the topic of adult literacy to the 2022 LRA Conference, please consider applying for the J. Michael Parker Award.   LRA awards the J. Michael Parker Award to new scholars for a paper they present at the conference that addresses adult literacy/language development and instruction. The award was established in 2001 in honor of J. Michael Parker, winner of LRA’s Student Outstanding Research Award for his work in community-based adult literacy. Eligibility To be true to the spirit of J. Michael Parker’s work, the award recognizes studies that examine ways adults further their own language and literacy development within or outside of formal learning contexts, including different social and cultural contexts for learning. The award is designed to encourage work in adult literacy with a variety of populations, including, but not limited to, learners in formal settings such as adult basic education and ESOL classes, family literacy with an emphasis on the adult, as well as those engaged in literacy practices embedded in diverse cultural settings.   In order to be considered for the J. Michael Parker Award, applicants must meet the following eligibility requirements: All of the author(s) of the paper must be doctoral students or early–career, untenuredfaculty at the time of the paper submission (October 1, prior to the Annual Meeting) The paper is based on a proposal accepted for presentation at the 2021 LRA AnnualMeeting. The author(s) of the paper are LRA members in good standing at the time of the paper submission. Award Details Recipients of the award receive a small cash award to be used for conference expenses, as well as a plaque commemorating the award. They are also recognized during a general session of the conference. The award is presented to papers with either a single author or multiple authors, wherein all authors must be a doctoral student(s) or early–career, untenured faculty. For single authored papers, the recipient will receive $500 and a plaque commemorating the award.   For co-authored papers, the recipients will each receive a plaque and will decide amongst themselves how to divide the $500 award. Criteria for Consideration for the Award The LRA member selected for receiving the J. Michael Parker Award should conduct research that is judged capable of making a significant contribution to the theory and/or practice of adult literacy learning and instruction. This means that the paper will be judged by: The overall quality of the research includes consideration of purpose, theoreticalframing, methodology, findings, and conclusions. How the manuscript addresses the theory and/or practice of adult literacy in community or postsecondary learning and instruction within or outside of formal learning contexts, including different social and cultural contexts for learning. The contribution of the research to the field (e.g., the impact of the research on theory, knowledge, or practice in the field of literacy studies). Only one award should be given each year (this is to ensure that there are sufficient funds to support participation at the LRA annual conference).   Applicants are required to submit a proposal of their research to the LRA 2021 Conference. If the proposal is accepted, a full research paper (see guidelines below) based on the accepted proposal, must be submitted electronically via email to the chair Mikel W. Cole (mikel.w.cole@gmail.com) by October 1, 2022.   Required Materials Due October 1, 2022, sent via email to mikel.w.cole@gmail.com: A full research paper should be no longer than 25 pages (double–spaced and 12–point font), excluding references and appendices. The research paper should be blinded with no identifying information. It should be sent in a Microsoft Word or PDF format. A one–page cover letter should include the following information: Status (doctoral student or untenured faculty) of each author Information about LRA presentation: Date/time/type of session A paragraph addressing how the paper meets the award criteria If the paper is a small part of a larger study, describe the context and methodologyof the larger study. Also, describe this research in relation to being part ofwork conducted by an advisor/tenured faculty member.   Potential applicants are encouraged to contact the award chair (Mikel W. Cole, (mikel.w.cole@gmail.com) to discuss how their research may fit with the intentions of the award and to make inquiries

Submit Content for Critical Conversations

Submit Content for Critical Conversations Critical Conversations (in Literacy Research & Education) is the name of the stream of posts and updates at the front of the LRA website. Our mission is to create a space for students, educators, and researchers to share their narratives to create an inclusive and equitable teaching, learning, and working environment for all. This blog feed and the website provides educators, researchers, and related stakeholders with the tools, resources, and community they need so that they can connect research to practice in literacy learning experiences. What do we publish? Content in this feed will focus on making a specific area of expertise more accessible and understandable to a wider audience. We will frame the rigor, responsibility, and rectitude of academia while identifying opportunities for scholars to speak in a manner that is approachable and accessible. We must make intellectual work accessible, and accessible work intellectual. Approachable in this sense means content that is easy to engage, understand, and know. Accessible in this sense means that you can actually read it. Approachable means that you can use it. Accessible means that you can get it. The blog feed on the website will serve as the main origin of content for the organization. Content will start here and then be shared out through the varied social networks.  Content in the Critical Conversations feed will include: News – The Newsletter and information from the organization. Updates – Information from Standing Committees, ICGs, Area Chairs, etc. Resources – This will include updates and publications from JLR and LRTMP. This will include Policy Alerts, Research Papers, etc. In the future, we hope to open up a process to review and publish Stories from members of the organization as they engage in literacy education and research. What does this mean for me? All updates from the organization, including the newsletter, reports from ICGs and Area Chairs, and announcements from Standing Committees will all be published on the website. To make sure you don’t miss out on any updates, please pay attention to the website, as well as the social accounts for LRA. In addition, we’re working on using a system to send regular updates to your email inbox if you’d rather have that support. Want to submit materials for Critical Conversations? If you’re a chair of a Standing Committee, ICG, or Area Chair, one of the e-editors should have reached out to you already to schedule content to be added to the website. If you’d like to email the e-editors directly, contact us at write@literacyresearchassociation.org. Alternatively, you can complete this form and an e-editor will get in contact with you shortly.

Shooting in Uvalde, TX

Dear LRA Family and Friends, Once again and too soon, we are mourning more senseless and horrific deaths as a result of another mass shooting in America—this time 19 third, and fourth graders and two teachers at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. This unconscionable loss of life and the aftermath of unspeakable pain, grief, and anger should touch us all deeply as literacy educators and researchers. These are our children too.   We seem to have come to the point in this country where we can assume there is no safe place. Schools, grocery stores, churches, synagogues, mosques, movie theaters, concerts, restaurants, and many other places have been sites for mass violence. Shootings have been attributed to retribution, anger, fear of the other, mental illness, and other causes. School dress codes have begun including bans on “body armor,” and, in many places, security officers and metal detectors now greet students at the school door. Yet, the violence goes on, seemingly uninhibited.   Gun violence has now outstripped car crashes as the leading cause of death among youth in the United States. There are now more guns in America than people—a shocking average of 120 firearms per person—with Yemen (53) and Serbia (39) a far distant second and third. Firearm deaths of civilians since 1968 have now reached 1.5 million persons—more than the number of soldiers killed in every U.S. conflict since the American War for Independence in 1775. So far, there have been more mass shootings than days in 2022.   The nation’s children, youth, and their teachers are LRA’s intimate partners in our work to understand all forms of literacies—their classrooms are our workplace. All children in schools and the adults who teach and serve them deserve to be safe, but they are not. As concerned citizens and voters, we are not powerless. There are many firearm safety measures which could be passed at both state and federal levels, but are stalled due to political gridlock, and the undue influence of gun advocacy groups. And the sad fact is that there are more police than nurses and counselors in many schools.   In addition to passing firearm safety laws, there is also a dramatic disparity in trained mental health professionals who might be in a position to recognize early on the reasons for an individual’s psychological trauma and treat it before it burgeons into violence and death. Therefore, I urge all of you to do what you can to convince our local, state and federal lawmakers that our children’s safety, physical and mental,—the safety of all of us—should be their first priority.   On behalf of the LRA Board of Directors,

Submit Your 2023 LRA Board Nominations!

WE NEED YOUR INPUT. Please nominate LRA members who are willing to serve a 3-year term as an LRA Board Member or make a 5-year commitment to matriculate through the presidential line (VP-elect, VP, Pres-elect, President, Past President). Please nominate members in good standing who “represent the priorities included in the LRA Mission statement, particularly with respect to leadership, scholarship, diversity, and membership.” Self-nominations are welcome. To nominate someone: make sure they are willing to serve; send their name and CV (please be sure CVs include service to LRA). By Monday, June 6th send your nominations with corresponding VITA to Alfred T. Tatum (atatum@literacyresearchassociation.org). Please indicate “Nomination for Election 2023” in the subject line. Indicate also whether they are being nominated to serve as a board member only (3-year commitment) or to serve in the presidential line (5-year commitment).

Accepting Nominations for the 2022 P. David Pearson Scholarly Influence Award

LRA is seeking nominations for the P. David Pearson Scholarly Influence Award. The purpose of this annual award is to honor, in P. David Pearson’s name, the author(s) of an article, chapter, or book written at least 5 years prior to the nomination, which has positively and demonstrably influenced literacy practices and/or policies within district, school and/or classroom contexts.   Nominators should demonstrate how the findings or implications of the article, chapter, or book have been used directly by educators or education personnel to craft influential policies and/or initiate and implement innovative classroom practices. Read the following procedures for additional details regarding this award.   The P. David Pearson Scholarly Influence Award is presented at the Annual Conference and recipients receive a plaque and monetary award. Criteria for Consideration for the Award Authors wishing to be considered for the P. David Pearson Scholarly Influence Award, or a person who wishes to nominate the author(s) of a piece of writing, are asked to submit the nominated piece, along with a letter of nomination laying out the case for the nomination and providing documentation regarding the influence of the piece on educators’ practices and/or curricula, and/or policy. Impact and influence can be measured both qualitatively (e.g., through testimonials from practitioners and policymakers) and quantitatively (e.g., through citation data).   The nomination materials should also include the CV(s) of the nominated author(s) which can be helpful in situating the nominated piece within a larger body of work and can provide further evidence of influence/impact.   Please note that nominations will be considered automatically for a period of three years and that nominators can revise and/or amend the nomination package for the subsequent years that the nomination is under consideration.   The nomination package should be sent to the co-chairs of the P. David Pearson Scholarly Influence Award Committee by September 5, 2022. The co-chairs are Miranda Fitzgerald and Annemarie Palincsar. Criteria for Review Each nomination package will be reviewed and scored for evidence of depth, breadth, and duration of the influence, or potential for influence, over time.   DEPTH: The influence of the article/chapter/book on literacy policy or practice has been deeply positive/substantial. Clarification/evidence (for example): Nomination letter and/or other materials may speak to the depth of influence by describing/illustrating the (a) unique contribution of the piece (b) ways in which the piece ushered in a paradigm shift, (c) innovative/revolutionary findings and/or implications of the piece, etc.    BREADTH: The influence of the article/chapter/book on literacy policy or practice has been widespread. Clarification/evidence (for example): Nomination letter and/or other materials may speak to the breadth of influence/impact by describing/illustrating the (a) influence of the piece within a broader program of research, (b) uptake of findings/implications of the piece by different authors/subsequent publications, (c) reach of the impact/influence on classrooms/schools/districts, etc.   ENDURANCE or POTENTIAL FOR LONG-TERM INFLUENCE: The influence of the article/chapter/book on literacy policy or practice has been sustained over time. Clarification/evidence (for example): The nomination letter and/or other materials may speak to the duration/endurance of influence by describing/illustrating the (a) influence of the piece over time on manuscripts that were published (by the nominated author/authors) following the publication of the nominated piece, (b) ways in which the findings/implications of the piece have been taken up in policy/instructional practice over a period of time, (c) how the influence/impact of the piece has grown over time, etc.      

Accepting Nominations for the 2022 Arthur Applebee Award

Please take a moment to submit a nomination for an article for the Arthur Applebee Award for Excellence in Research on Literacy. The deadline is Tuesday, September 6, 2022.   The Arthur Applebee Award for Excellence in Research on Literacy is presented annually to honor an outstanding article in literacy research published in a refereed journal in the previous calendar year. The award is presented in memory of University at Albany – SUNY Distinguished Professor, Arthur N. Applebee, internationally renowned for his seminal scholarship in the fields of literacy and language learning. Eligibility In order to be considered for the Arthur Applebee Award, an article must meet the following eligibility requirements: A research article published in a refereed journal between January 1, 2021 and December 31, 2021 (for the 2022 recipient). For articles appearing in print only or in both print and on-line versions, the date of print version should be used to determine the date of publication. For articles appearing only on-line, the date of release should be used to determine the year of publication. If you are at all uncertain, please consult the journal editors to determine what they regard as the official year of publication. Refereed journals are construed to include journals published around the world, with the proviso that the content is available in English. Criteria for Consideration for the Award The topic of literacy research is construed broadly to include research that informs literacy theory, practice, and/or policy. Nominated articles should make significant contributions to the field, yielding the kind of “ah ha” moment that causes the field to see ideas in new ways with promise to positively influence literacy education. Contributions to the field may include articles that either substantively develop or add to an existing area of research, combine existing areas of research, or create a new or less considered area of investigation. As an award of the Literacy Research Association, the award focuses on the broadest possible conceptualization of literacy, including all the epistemological, methodological, disciplinary, and topical perspectives found in LRA. Award Details Recipients of the award receive a small cash award and a plaque commemorating the award. The authors are also recognized during a general session of the conference. For more information, see this webpage. Nomination Process To nominate an article, please send an electronic copy of the article and a nomination letter that states how the article meets the criteria to Kathleen Hinchman by Tuesday, September 6, 2022. Self-nominations are accepted.

Focusing On Publishing Research That Makes a Difference

The Lead Editors of Literacy Research: Theory, Method, and Practice (LR:TMP), Volumes 70-72, will use this blog to advance publishing transparency and ethics. We will also promote content from past issues, link to online first articles for an upcoming issue, and broadcast messages about opportunities for publishing and reviewing for LR:TMP.   To promote transparency, we will share with the LRA community parts of the editorship proposal for LR:TMP. Our vision includes a Focus Upon Publishing Ethical Research that Makes an Affirmative Difference in the World. Here is an excerpt from our proposal:   The world is now and always has been in a state of perpetual flux, so ethical literacies scholarship must continuously recalibrate and transform to address new opportunities and problems and to inquire more generatively into seemingly intractable issues. A review of conference themes over the past 15 years shows a persistent optimism that literacy research has a part to play in “illuminating the future,” setting in motion “activism, community, and love,” and “mobilizing,” “expanding,” or “widening” pathways toward a better world. We agree.  But the invisible hand of progress doesn’t inexorably move in this direction; rather, if affirmative change materializes, it is through ethically-engaged, justice-oriented practices that frequently conflict with the status quo. We believe the journal is in a unique position to expeditiously circulate life-affirming practices, theories, methods, and policy positions that warrant our optimism in the power of transformative literacies and move the field forward.To advance this scholarship, we will:– Highlight in each issue a paper (or set of papers) that exhibits a profound commitment to research that significantly contributes to making the world more just (e.g. through improving the lives of some segment of the population; advancing the field in theory, method, or policy).– Focus on troubling conversations about literacies research and the complex web of factors that affect it. For example, we look forward to putting into conversation different scholarly approaches centering on politically volatile topics of grave concern in literacies research, such as immigration policies, rising racism in schools and society, and environmental sustainability.   In our first issue (Volume 70), we recognized the work of the Literacy Futurisms Collective-in-the-Making for their paper “We Believe in Collective Magic”: Honoring  the Past to Reclaim the  Futures of Literacy Research. They earned the first “More Just World” Award, fulfilling our proposal promise outlined in #1 above.   In 2020, LRA President-Elect Gwendolyn McMillon designed a series of Collaborative Panel Discussions for the annual conference. These focused upon antiracism, Black Lives Matter in Literacy Research,Black Boys’ Literacies, and the Science of Reading. These invited papers to Volume 70 more than fulfilled our promise in #2 above, plus Volume 70’s accepted papers in part also fulfill this promise. For example, check out Presiado and Frieson’s article,“Make Sure You See This’: Counternarratives of Multilingual BlackGirls’ Language and Literacy Practices,” which focuses on the wealth of language and literacy practices that their Black, multilingual girl participants contributed to schools through their multidimensional counternarratives that challenged dominant White Mainstream narratives.   All LR:TMP articles are available to LRA Members. Log in and go toLR:TMP Member Access to view the current and prior issues.

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